Friday, January 23, 2009

apologies

Arrrh...guest partner, who I trusted, ot busy on a matter and didn't draft the entry.  I'm sorry we kept you waiting.  I really thought GP would get this done.  GP is in some hot water with me now.  You shouldn't let your friends down.  If you commit to a task, you do it, even if you are busy. There is always some time.  I told GP that it isn't as easy as it seems, writing something for the blog, but it doesn't take that long once you sit down and get the thoughts rolling.

Oh well, I will give GP a second chance when GP is ready.  I'm sorry we kept you folks waiting.  You deserved better.

I will post this weekend.  If you've got pressing questions, send them along and I will see what I can do.  Happy Friday! 

10 comments:

Good Advice said...

If you want this blog to succeed (e.g., beat the K lawyer blog), you are going to need to need to up the post count.

Anonymous said...

There are more than a few of us, I'm sure, who'd be willing to write some posts too. Perhaps you can run a contest to recruit outside posters?

Anonymous said...

What should judicial law clerks who do not have offers be doing to get jobs?

Anonymous said...

"Perhaps you can run a contest to recruit outside posters?"

Yeah, that worked swimmingly for abovethelaw.com.

Really. I swear.

Anonymous said...

The problem with the ATL "contest" is the winner got to call the shots, and Elie Mystal turned out to be a weak, unentertaining, negative, and cynical editor-in-chief. I'm not arguing for censorship, but HP can at least organize some degree of quality control over what gets posted if he wishes.

Plus, this blog isn't about being funny, or about breaking the latest and greatest news. You just have to make sure the tone is appropriate, the advice is sound, and the information is accurate. As people mentioned already, a lot of the information here is about reminding people to exercise good judgment, good common sense, and giving some direction / guidance when the areas are gray. Should only require editing and adding in some nuance here and there, rather than any active censorship, IMO. I just don't see the ATL mistake being repeated here.

z said...

But yes, something has to be done if this blog is to stay active.

A blog that is slower than a post per week is not worth following.

Anonymous said...

Agreed, I'd say it should shoot for at least 2-3 posts per week.

Anonymous said...

I don't know how many years you have been practicing law or how many years you have been a hiring partner, but can you give those of us who recently graduated some perspective regarding graduation during a recession? Specifically regarding our employment several years down the road. We are coming up to the "9 months out of graduation" mark, and I am definitely not one of the 90% of graduates listed as employed on USNews.

My fear is being "cursed" for future employment. I know of a couple of contract attorneys who will forever be contract attorneys. They could only find contract work and have been stuck doing contract work for the past 10years. What should the class of 2008 do if we don't have a job as this recession progresses? I mean, when the economy does turn around, will we be viewed positively for first year associate positions or are we branded as "unemployable" at law firms? How have you and other law firms treated lawyers who are 1+ years out of law school, never worked at a law firm, and are trying to apply to your firm as an attorney (assuming that they have the grades/stats you would normally hire)? Beyond doing pro bono work, I don't know what else I can do. The only job postings out there are for 3-10+ year experienced attorneys and we can never get that kind of experience until we get our first job! Plus, there are so many experienced attorneys out there without a job, they are applying to these "entry level" jobs and taking a paycut.

Sorry if this sounds whiney, but it's so darn frustrating when you go to a tier 1 law school, graduate with honors, do law review, moot court, clinic and everything they tell you to do, and then you graduate with $100K+ in student loans and can't even get a job at McDonalds because you are too over-qualified.

Anonymous said...

I'd like to see a post that gives advice to the 2009 summer associates. How can we distinguish ourselves to ensure we aren't no-offered? It seems that this year isn't "don't screw up and you get an offer." Advice on how to strategically position ourselves to increase chances would be appreciated...ranging from what practice groups are good (I realize this varies by firm/region to some extent) to things we can do to make associates/parnters want to work with us.

Anonymous said...

I haven't yet given up on this blog because the premise for it is great, but this won't last too much longer if you don't take it seriously. Take some personal accountability... don't blame someone else for there not being posts when there's nothing stopping you from doing them in the meantime.