Friday, July 18, 2008

Welcome to Hiring Partner's Blog!

Hello there.  Welcome to my blog.  Who is Hiring Partner?  I am the hiring partner at an office of an AM LAW 200 law firm.  I oversee on campus recruiting at targeted law schools for our office and local candidates for other firm offices.  I also manage our summer associate program.  I decide which law students get offers to come to our office for a full day of interviews after an initial screening  (aka "call backs").  I also decide which of these law students gets offers to join our summer associate program in my office.  When the summer program ends, I decide who gets an offer of full time employment.  I work with a recruiting committee and consult with the firm's hiring partner.  

Why blog?  Several of the hiring partners and recruiting staff have discussed issues that have arisen with respect to this new generation of budding lawyers, aka the millenials (sp?).  I keep hearing it is a generational thing.  I thought it would be useful to have a blog where law students and others can learn about things that -- despite their great grades and stellar pedigrees -- can nevertheless disrupt your getting an offer at the firm of your choice.  You would be amazed at some of the things that have been occurring.  Many of them involve the lack of simple common courtesies.  I don't think the students are generally ill-willed, but several examples seem to point to a common problem of failing to use common sense and good judgement.  These are two very important qualities when it comes to lawyering.  So, thanks for stopping by the blog and I hope that Hiring Partner's insights help you in your journey as you finish up your summer associate programs and as we head into the fall on campus recruiting season.  This blog is not meant to chastise, but merely to guide -- to give law students (and perhaps others, since many of these themes are universal -- insight to the decisionmaking process of the Hiring Partner.  We will also tap into the guidance of the recruiting coordinator, the professional staff member who oversees firm recruiting.  And, we may even have some guest Hiring Partners from time to time.   I hope it is an educational, productive, and fun journey!  

Disclaimer:  The views expressed herein are those of this Hiring Partner (or as specified, guest participants).  All opinions herein are those of the individual blogger and not of Hiring Partner's firm or any particular firm.  

7 comments:

Craig said...

As a rising 2L, I was pleased to find the link to this blog in this morning's WSJ law blog. Keep up the good advice as we move into OCI season!

Hiring Partner said...

Hi Craig, not to fear, we've got some good words of wisdom for OCI. Actually should get to that soon since many Hiring Partners are reviewing resumes already. I have many years of OCIs to share as examples!

Craig said...

Wait, already reviewing resumes? Guess I need to get my act together...

It'd also be great to hear your thoughts on how to approach the sort of smaller or mid-size firms that don't tend to participate in the OCI "cattle calls"

Thanks!

sgp said...

I'm a rising 3L evening student about to be participating in OCI. I've worked full-time throughout law school. I know there is a negative connotation regarding evening law students, and I am wondering, do you have any advice on marketing ourselves? Thanks.

Heather said...

You say that you are the hiring partner, but at the end of the first paragraph you describe your duties in part: "I work with a recruiting committee and consult with the firm's hiring partner." How do you consult with yourself? Is this a mistake or are you actually the head of legal recruiting (not a partner)?

Village Idiot said...

I believe he said he was the hiring partner for one of the firm's offices, not for the entire firm.

Eleanor said...

As a biglaw lawyer (but not an HP), I see this same problem with summers all the time. It may, indeed, be generational: I had to work the front counter in my father's sign business dealing with customers (standing on a box to see over the counter). Before I was old enough to do that, I worked in the back in the print shop. By the time I graduated high school, I could answer a phone properly, knew that the customer needs to believe his is right, and that being nice to the receptionist is never a mistake. I'm not even 40 yet - and the difference in what young adults seem to learn before graduating these days is staggering. It's sort of an attitude issue, or a lack of being taught the basic manners of the work culture. These include: (1) hold up your end of the work, (2) be pleasant about it, (3) never bark down the chain, and (4) remember that you don't just work for the company - you work for the people above you. If you seek to make them look good, and express loyalty up the chain, that loyalty and success will reflect down to you. If it doesn't, leave and go where you will be appreciated. Preferably, come and work with me!